The Limassol castle consists of a palimpsest of structures. On the exact place a 13th-century church was gradually transformed into the fort we see today. However, until its final form, edifices of distinct roles occupied the site. In chronological order these are a Byzantine basilica, the aforementioned church, a defensive tower (réduit), storage cellars, prison cells, a police station and finally a monument and museum in recent times. The continuous transition of the role of buildings on the site mirror the political upheaval of Cyprus' history throughout the centuries.

Appendix

Photograph of the Interior of Limassol Castle
Photograph of Limassol Medieval Castle / Museum
Photograph of Gothic Hall at Lemesos Castle
Photograph of Limassol Medieval Castle
Photograph of Limassol Medieval Castle by night
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street (1930)
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street (1930)
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street (1960)
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street (1950)
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street (1980)
Photograph of Makarios Archbishop of Cyprus visit the Medival Castle (1964)
Photograph of Flagstaff at Medieval Castle for the crown of Queen Elizabeth of England (1953)
Photograph of Medieval Castle at Eirinis Street (2000)

Collection


Kolossi castle is a medieval castle built in the 15th century A.D. It is also known as Koulas. The donjon lies in the vicinity of the village of the same name in the south-western outskirts of Limassol. The plain on which the castle is located is one of the agriculturally richest regions of the island from which the renowned Commandaria comes from. The order of Saint John, the owners of the castle, initiated the production of the wine which reached even north-European royal courts. The castle constitutes one of the most important building works of the Frankish period (A.D. 1191-1489). Its services were multi-faceted throughout the centuries including being: the main residence of the Grand Commander and the administrative centre of the Order; the estates’ nucleus for the production of sugar and other products of the region; the domination symbol of the Hospitallers; a storage house; water features; and viewpoints. Before the erection of the current castle, a quadrangular curtain wall with supporting rooms on the west side, related to the refinement of sugar, must occupied the area. However, the keep which one can see today was built in the 1450s by Louis de Magnac, the General Commander of the Hospitallers in Cyprus. The fortress is an enormous square, well-built, three-story edifice, built from local limestone ashlar blocks.

Appendix

Postcard with Cypriots and the Kolossi castle on the background (Sofoklis Aipavlitis Archive, 1919)
Postage stamp of King George V depicting Kolossi castle 2 1/2 piasters (1934)
Postage stamp of King George VI depicting Kolossi castle 2 1/2 piasters (1938)
Postage stamp of King George VI depicting Kolossi castle 3 piasters (1938)
Postage stamp of King George VI depicting Kolossi castle 4 piasters (1938)
Postage stamp of Kolossi Castle, EUROPA Issue Architecture (1978)
Photograph of the Kolossi castle during the 1950s-1960s (PIO – Press and Information Office)
Photograph of the Kolossi castle (Pattichion Municipal Museum, Historical Archive and Research Centre)
Photograph of the Kolossi Medieval Castle (13th centuary)

Collection