To the question "How would you react if after a solution you cannot return to your home, though some would probably return", put to the refugees in 1975 in a survey carried out by Takis Evdokas, they replied as follows: 17.0% I will fight those who signed; protests, demonstrations, uprising, with force, guerrila war. 5.0% I will commit suicide, I will suffer a heart attack, I’ ll be a physical wreck. 15.2% This cannot be, I will not accept. 2.8% I will emigrate. 25.1% I will feel bad, I’ll be bitter, I’ll cry, I’ll be disillusioned. 2.8% I’ll endure until I go too, I’ll wait.3.9 % I don’t know how I will counteract. 8.0% What can I do, I will not counteract. 5.3% I’ll be happy even if only half return rather than none let some return, I’ll be happy because the refugees will be less; let as many as possible return. 2.6% Seriously thinking I will take a decision, it does not matter if it is not very just; if the government says it is right and cannot do otherwise.
6.5% If proper compensation is given to those who stay I will not counteract. If the state will help me to relocate I will not counteract. 5.8% Nothing matters to me; I am disinterested; hate and other. 100% Total .The majority of the refugees about 70% reject a solution that does not foresee the return of all the refugees.

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Since its foundation in Paris, on 21st May 1904, FIFA has developed from the original seven to 204 member associations, making it one of the biggest and certainly the most popular sports federation in the world. With over 250 million active members, it has been instrumental in making football an attractive and important element in the social fabric of society. FIFA commemorated its Centennial with a variety of events and projects to pay tribute to the universality of the world's supreme and beautiful game and to honor people and places of historic importance to football.

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