Saints Cosmas and Damian, the so-called Anargyroi, decorate the zone west of the northern door of the narthex. They were twin brothers, therefore the garments which they are depicted with are identical. The same applies for their insignia, a medicine box and a lancet and the way they hold them.
Cosmas and Damian were called unmercenary because as doctors they were offering their medical services without accepting payment from patients. Cosmas and Damian are among the most popular saints, a fact that complicated the hagiographical stories regarding them and led to the mention of three pairs of Anargyroi in the synaxarion of Constantinopolitan church. The original pair, according to scholars, were born in Arabia, studied medicine in Syria and tortured to death under the reign of Diocletian.
In the Menaia, the two saints are commemorated as body and soul healers and along with the earlier portrait of Anastasia Pharmakolytria, they are linked to the message of redemption and salvation expressed in the narthex of Asinu. Last but not least, another interplay exists between them: Saint Mamas and the inscription of hippiatros accompanying the portrait of Saint George based on their ability to save not only humans but also animals.

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The portrait of Saint Marina is located on the northern semidome of the narthex, next to Cosmas and Damianus.
Marina is a universal saint, venerated both in the Latin and Orthodox church. The Latin church venerates her as Saint Margaret. She lived in Antioch, Pisidia and was martyred during the reign of Emperor Diocletian in the third century.
At Asinοu, Marina is depicted in her traditional Byzantine iconographic representation, wearing a red maphorion and holding the cross of martyrdom in her right hand. One may observe that the portraits of Saints Marina, Evdokia and Anna in the narthex of Asinοu are to be identified as identical figures.
Marina of Pisidia is frequently confused with Marina of Syria. Both saints were depicted on the columns of the Basilica of the Nativity in Bethlehem accompanied by Greek and Latin inscriptions declaring the importance of their worship for the Latin and Orthodox population of the Crusader Levant.
Marina of Pisidia, apart from her popularity in the Crusader states and Sinai as stated, was also widely venerated in Cyprus. Her depiction in Cypriot churches, though, began during the course of the thirteenth century. The earlier examples are to be found at Panayia in Kofinu, at Mutulas and at Saint Herakleidios in the monastery of Saint John Lampadistes at Kalopanayiotis.
Even though her depiction at Asinοu might be the traditional one, a less popular one, the triumphal victory over Satan, may function as a salvific model and connecting her to the pictorial program of the narthex.

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On the upper band of the soffit on the northern arch, the choirs of the Elect appear. From west to east they are recognised as the Choir of the Hierarchs, the Choir of the Prophets, the Choir of the Blessed and the Choir of the Martyrs. These constitute the saints and the righteous.
Each panel contains twelve or thirteen figures depicted in full-length with their hands raised and facing north, towards the Paradise. Saint John Chrysostom and Basil, as authors of liturgies, lead the way of the hierarchs, while Gregory of Nazianzus follows them. A brown-haired and bearded figure, probably Moses, and an elder man, probably Elijah, are seen to be the most prominent personalities of the choir of the prophets. An anchorite and an elderly monk are depicted leading the saints, dressed in a straw garment and kukulion, cloak and analabos, respectively. The martyrs George and Theodore are portrayed in the first row on the panel of the blessed.
The depiction of the groups of the Elect in rows as an iconographic tradition has its roots in the middle Byzantine period which also survived in the Palaiologan era. It is unusual, though, that at Asinou the scenes of the Elect do not appear on the right side of the prepared throne but on the left. In any case, they are depicted according to the norm, on the right hand side of the Pantokrator and Christ the Merciful.

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The figure of Saint Evdokia as part of a monumental painting program in Cyprus is rather a unicum.
Evdokia’s life comes in agreement with the salvific context of the narthex. This is probably the reason she was chosen instead of the other two saints who share the same name with her. She is commemorated on 1st of March as a martyr in the Orthodox Church. She was a beautiful woman, taking advantage of her charm, as a prostitute. She later repented and converted to Christianity, changing her life drastically to austere penance. According to her Vita, she was able to perform resurrection miracles and along with the weight given to penitence and redemption in the Menaion on her feast day, contributes to the promotion of the principal message conveyed through every depiction, salvation.

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On the northern half of the internal part of the west arch, the Scales of Justice are depicted. The whole scenery and the accompanying inscription Justice refers to and continues the eschatological concept that characterises the wall paintings of the narthex. A red semicircle, from which the scales hang by a chain, represents Heaven. An angel holds a scroll with the names of the souls to be judged while devils hold scrolls with the records of sins to be put on the balance. Also, black figures recognised as demons are trying to cheat the balance in order that the scale leans on their side.
The weighing of the soul is narrated in the book of Apocalypse 20:12, from which the Byzantine iconography draws upon the typical representation of the scene.

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The panel on the lower part of the soffit of the western arch of the narthex depicts Saint Paraskevi holding a medallion with Christ as the Man of Sorrows. On each side of His figure, His sigla can be read and behind Him the cross is painted.
Paraskevi (i.e. Friday), a martyr, was named as such because she was born on Friday. She was widely venerated across the Eastern Roman Empire but also in southern Italy.
The specific type of representation of Saint Paraskevi holding a medallion depicting the Man of Sorrows corresponds to the metaphorical portrayal of Good Friday, as on Friday Christ was placed and suffered on the cross. The scene was popular among the iconographic repertoire of churches in Cyprus during late medieval years and relics of her were kept in the monasteries of Kikkos, Mahairas and Saint Barbara.
The link of Saint Paraskevi with the Day of Judgement, and therefore with the whole iconographic program of the narthex, is additionally to be found on textual contents. In the Vespers service of 26 July, the date of her commemoration, Paraskevi is called to intervene with Christ on the Second Coming in order to protect the souls of the faithful. On the contrary, in Apocalypse of Anastasia, Paraskevi and others are mentioned not as defenders of the faithful but as prosecutors of the sinners, standing before the throne of the Almighty.

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On the north jamb of the west door of the narthex, apotropaic crosses with a waived crown of thorns and cryptograms are represented.
The cross is in brown colour and the letters in black. Both are painted in a white background.
Cross as a pattern has a prophylactic function against evil powers. Thus its presence on the doorway seems legit.
Regarding the cryptograms written on the jambs of the narthex, praise the sacrifice of Christ on the cross, his mercy, attest the faith of the martyrs and underline the eschatological and salvific meaning of the cross .

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The multi-scene composition over the western doorway of the narthex conveys the message of the Last Judgement, as does the entire wall-painting program of the narthex.
On the upper part of the lunette, the Preparation of the Throne depicted. In front of it a double-armed cross stands with the crown of the thorns and in front of these are the gospel book and the Holy Spirit pictured as a white dove. On both sides of the cross, the spear, the sponge and the sigla of Christ, are illustrated reminiscing the Passion. A red mandorla bearing eyes and wings surrounds the throne while and Eve kneel and raise their hands. The Holy Trinity is symbolised with the throne, the cross and the Gospel book and the dove
The polysemic composition bears multiple meanings on different levels with the most prominent being the eschatological one.
On the central part of the left side of the lunette, the Fiery Stream is represented. An entirely painted-in-red angel pushes a group of sinners to the flames with a trident. On the front line there is a king, a queen, lori and three hierarchs. The inscriptions written, read: place the sinners into the fire and the fiery stream. The Fiery Stream refers indirectly to the Second Coming as in a homily accredited to Hippolytos, another homily addressed to Emperor Constantine the 5th and in the Apocalypse of Anastasia.
On the left corner of the lunette, Hades is personified as a naked winged man riding a monster with an inscription: the insatiable Hades.
On the right side of the lunette a Trumpeting Angel is figured. In front of the angel, there is an empty sarcophagus and two groups of souls within clouds. The souls are personified as children dressed in white garments and with covered heads. The inscription cites the epistle of Paul towards the Thessalonians 4:17 reads: we will be caught up together with them in the clouds.

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Timotheos and Mavra are the saints portrayed in the north of the western door of the narthex.
Saint Timotheos appears as a young beardless man holding the cross of the martyrs and a codex. Codex is his attribute because, according to his Vita, while he was an ecclesiastical reader in a town in Upper Egypt, he refused to obey the commander of the province to burn the sacred books. Therefore, Timotheos and his wife were condemned to death in 286 A.D.
According to the synaxarion of the Constantinopolitan church, Timotheos and Mavra did not have any relation to Cyprus. A local tradition, though, says that the two saints were martyred in Cyprus.
Regarding Saint Mavra, in Cypriot iconography she is depicted both alone and along with her husband.

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On the right lower part of the west wall of the narthex, next to the western door, Saint Anna and her benefactress, Anna Lahana, are depicted. Saint Anna was incorporated in several iconographic programs in churches in Cyprus, either included in the Mariological cycle as the mother of Virgin Mary or portrayed with her husband, Joachim. Nonetheless, Anna was seldom portrayed on her own. In Cyprus, only at Asinou and the church of Saint Mamas at Luvaras, dated to 1495, she is represented isolated.
The two female figures are portrayed in a rectangular panel with a dark blue background. Saint Anna is painted holding a cross, even though she did not die as a martyr. It appears that by the Middle Byzantine period, painters attributed to her the cross and the red-coloured maphorion.
Saint Anna was not only the selection of her homonymous donor, expressing her piety, but was also in line with the salvific iconographic program of the narthex of Asinou. Specifically, despite her relation to fertility and giving birth, Anna as the mother of Virgin was worshipped for her contribution to the incarnation of Christ and therefore as a key character for the salvation of humankind.
Anna Lahana, the donor of the portrait, is represented in a smaller scale with raised hands towards her patron saint in gesture of pleading. The accompanying inscription reads: 'Prayer of the servant of God Anna of Lahanas'. Anna wears a white long dress, tighter on the upper part, with long sleeves. Red and black geometrical patterns decorate the cuffs and the collar of her dress imitating woven garments. In addition, a long black mantle covers her from the top of the head and is loosely adhered by two red ribbons fastened on red patches. A white headdress wraps her hair and neck and is decorated with woven parallel red bands.
Donor Anna wears garments that reflect the local clothing tradition and production. Anastasia Saramalina’s garment has the same ribbons which are attached to rectangular patches on the cloth and hold loosely the mantle. Anna’s headdress is also worn in the same way by a deceased woman in the church of the Holy Cross at Pelendri. This is aligned with the late medieval directive according to which contemporary fabrics could be depicted in lay and religious scenes. Lastly, regarding the thriving weaving craft in Cyprus at that time, the type of embroidered ornaments of Anna’s garments seem to be a prosperous local production which has been maintained until today, especially in the village of Fyti. For this, the name of these textiles is fythkiotika.

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