On the soffit of the south arch of the narthex, depictions of the Torments of the Damned are placed.
On the western side, the representations refer to group punishments and they are developed within rectangulars. These are the worm that sleepeth not, the gnashing of teeth, Tartarus and the outer darkness. The group of people in each representation are discerned only via symbols and inscriptions such as white lines corresponding to worms in the panel of Worm that Sleepeth Not, visible teeth for the scene of the Gnashing Teeth, poor light in the scene of Tartarus and dark light for the Outer Darkness. An important detail is that the figures are turned to the centre of the narthex where Christ, the Supreme Judge, is pictured while raised eyebrows and brown brushstrokes on the face of the condemned declare grief and torture.
Regarding the subject of the scenes, these are mentioned in apocalyptic texts and church hymnography. The Worm, the Gnashing of Teeth and the Outer Darkness are representations drawn by the Gospels of Mark and Matthew and are sung again and again in troparia. However, Tartarus is an unusual appearance in iconography and hymnography.
In terms of iconography, the representation of the damned as a unified group, half lengthened as in Asinou, belongs to a long-standing tradition which is abandoned in the Palaiologan era. From this period on, the damned are represented in full length and separated.
By contrast, on the eastern side of the southern arch of the narthex, individual torments are represented. As on the opposite side, the four scenes are developed within square partitions and are identified as: he who ploughs over the boundaries and the dishonest miller, the thief and the slanderer, the usurer and falsifier of weights and the faithless nun, the faithless monk and the woman who refuses to nurse her children.
The figures are depicted naked, bounded by restraints and hanged over flames. The equipment, symbols and inscriptions which accompany the figures contribute to distinguish the identity of each one. In fact, those symbols and the message of each scene have a didactic purpose and an apotropaic impact to the agrarian congregation of Asinou.
Most possibly the selection of the specific individual sins portrayed in Asinou represents the rural and monastic environment of the Phorviotisa monastery. Counterparts in Venetian Crete, such as village churches, follow a common tradition depicting aspects of the local historical and social conditions such as crimes in an agrarian society.

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Saint Irene, the Daughter of Saint Spiridon, constitutes an iconographical unicum, attested only at Asinou church. She holds a cross, the characteristic feature of a martyr and wears a maphorion of brown and dark blue colours.
Information concerning her life are drawn exclusively from the Life of Saint Spiridon. According to the story, an unknown man handed over his personal valuable items to her before leaving on a journey. When he returned he was informed that Irini was dead and he was terrified that he lost all his belongings. Then he visited his father and Saint Spyridon went to her grave and called her back to life in order to indicate to him where she had buried his valuable things.
The explanation for choosing Saint Irini to be displayed in the narthex must be twofold. Primarily she is linked to the message of narthex’s iconographic program regarding the Second Coming and resurrection and secondly due to the fact that she is a local saint.

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The wall-painting of the Virgin of Mercy and Latin Donors is on the semidome of the south apse of the narthex and shows a Latin widowed mother and her children praying to her patron saint Virgin.
The fresco represents an outstanding case, along with others, of a historical reality. It offers an insight to the multicultural character of Lusignan Cyprus and the impact of Greek and Latin cultures on one another. The wall-painting is a hybrid, as it was offered by a Latin lady to an Orthodox church with Latin and Greek iconography and style and a Greek inscription.
This image of the Mother of God belongs to the western iconographic type of the Madonna della Misericordia as Mary extends her mantle in protective mercy over supplicants. Although the iconographic type of the Virgin is Latin, particular features relate her with local Orthodox and Eastern Mediterranean artistic production, such as Mary’s maphorion which was common in late thirteenth-century Cypriot icons or the pearled-rimmed haloes attested in icons at Sinai, which are believed to be artistic products of Crusaders or Cypriot painters.
The Latin benefactress wears a cloak-like black veil, a garment believed to have been introduced by refugees of Western European origin from Palestine. The fresco dedication was executed possibly to express her appreciation for her own and her sons’ survival after the siege of the last bulwark of Christianity in the Levant, Acre, in 1291 A.D. and presumably in memory of her husband.

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The monk Kallinikos is depicted on the west respond of the south arch, above the petitioner Vasilios. The inscription is placed above the head of the monk and reads: prayer of the servant of God Kallinikos the monk. He is portrayed facing to the east, with his face now faded, and wearing the characteristic monastic attire, i.e. dark grey girdled tunic, black kukulion and black boots with pointed ends. His hands are raised in prayer and one of them is painted outside the frame, overlapping the red band. In this way his petition is integrated into the space of the narthex and the visitor can imagine him physically asking for deesis.
Paradoxically, Kallinikos is depicted in the south bay of the narthex and is the only monk who is represented among the area where the donors are. Normally, monks were depicted on the east wall in proximity to the Virgin Phorviotisa and the Deesis or on the northern half of the narthex where the Paradise and the Justice are.

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Basilios Drakocheres is portrayed on the west respond of the south arch, under the monk Kallinikos. His face is turned eastward with his hands raised in prayer. His clothing, rolled hair and head garment resemble the Western clothing of the portrait of the donor of Saint Georgios Mahairemenos. Specifically, he wears a white cotte discerned from the white cuffs, a long dark blue coat and a white coif. The inscription reads: 'Prayer of the servant of God Basileios Drakocheres.'

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George, the donor of the portrait of his patron saint, is depicted as a bearded man dressed in an entirely Western apparel. He wears a dark coat with a brown lining, seen through the front opening, sleeves and neck, which is folded back in order to form the two triangular parts of a collar. Under the coat, he wears a dark blue cotte which has long tight sleeves, each with five white buttons and pointed shoes and raises his hands towards his patron saint. He also wears a white bonnet-type cap, reflecting Italian and French head garments of the thirteenth and the first half of the fourteenth century with the traditionally accompanied hairstyle, rolled outward.

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The wall-painting of Saint George on horseback, in the type of Diasorites, is placed in the conch of the south apse of the narthex and it is dated to the early thirteenth century.
As stated by the inscription, Nikiphorus Kallias, a farrier of horses, was the donor of the fresco. The choice of Saint George was not only due to the fact that he was famous among other saints, but also due to the connection of his patron’s occupation and his characteristic as a protector of cattle.
Saint George stands out as one of the most elaborated frescoes in Asinou church reflecting the wealth of the donor. He is depicted in lavish materials such as gold, silver, cinnabar and the distinctive blue, lapis lazuli. The set in which he was portrayed is a spare landscape while he is riding eastward to the bema with his bright red cape flowing. Being chief of the elite corps of saint stratilate, George wears military blue and ginger colour garments embellished with pearls and gems and an imperial crown, particular features of holy warriors. Behind him is his splendid round shield painted with stars and medallions and adorned with pearls around a cross supported with a crescent moon. Lastly, the horse occupies a large surface of the fresco and is depicted in an active position.

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Saint Mamas is pictured on the wall of the south apse of the narthex, adjacent to Saint George. It is considered as additional to the protective and therapeutic implication of the fresco program of the area, as he was seen as a holy warrior and a curer.
The figure of Saint Mamas in the church of Asinu is one of the earliest in Cyprus and dates to the layer of 1332 A.D.. He is depicted beardless with a youthful face, riding a lion and having a lamb in his left hand and a shepherd’s crook in his right.
The image of Mamas riding a lion and holding both his attributes in the frescoes of Asinu is one of the earliest examples of the variant. In other instances, Mamas was depicted either only riding the lion, or holding the lamb and the shepherd’s crook.
Saint Mamas was especially venerated in both East and West, so his worship in Cyprus was not to remain unaffected. Traditionally, he was a protector of shepherds and curer of their flocks and therefore, he was a beloved saint on Cyprus and in other sheep-breeding areas such as kapadokia, Crete, Macedonia and Serbia. On the other hand, the Lusignan court in Cyprus was promoting the worship of Saint Mamas as he was a favoured patron saint in the West with the most prominent example being the Cathedral of Langres in Champagne.
Lastly, a connotation of the placement of Saint Mamas’s figure opposite the portrait of Saint Anastasia could not be hypothetical, as to both saints were attributed the characteristic of the curer.

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On the lower level of the eastern side of the soffit of the south arch of the narthex is the portrait of Saint George Machairemenos who is rarely represented in iconographic cycles in Cyprus. On his left, the benefactor George is depicted. The accompanied inscription reads Saint George the Knifed, which is a Cypriot dialectical variant of Machairomenos. St George is portrayed as an attractive young man with a typical attire consisting of an embroidered tunic and a cross in his right hand. He also has a relief halo.
According to the fifteenth century chronicler Mahairas, St George Machairemenos is i.e. a local man who works miracles. His cult can be found in the vicinity of Achlionatas village, today known as Analiontas south of Nicosia. Additionally, in the eighteenth century, the historian Archimandrite Kiprianos characterises him as one of the three hundred ‘Alaman’ saints; who found shelter in Cyprus during the repeated population movement from the mainland to the island taking place in the long Arab conquest.

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The Prophet Zechariah or Zaharias is depicted on the southern half of the soffit above the eastern doorway of the narthex. As Prophet Isaiah on the other side, he is depicted as an old man with grey long hair and a pointed beard but, additionally, Zacharias wears the priestly hat, an ornamented grey tunic and the so-called paludamentum, bordered with pearls and gems and held together with a brooch. The passage written on the scroll, taken from Luke I:68, reads Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, for he has looked favourably. The inscription reminds of a passage from Matthew 3:2 and 4:17 : “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near” ; which is depicted on the scroll of John the Forerunner below. Similarly, the conveyed message is again that salvation will happen only when one is repentant.
The figure at Asinou, can be easily confused between the Prophet Zechariah and priest Zacharias, the father of John the Forerunner. Prophet Zachariah is usually portrayed as a beardless, bareheaded young man while priest Zacharias is depicted as an old man with the priest hat and the scroll. Therefore a confusion arises regarding which person is depicted in the narthex of Asinou. Nonetheless, as from the twelfth century onwards the two figures are frequently fused. In Asinou, however, the priest Zacharias as a prophet must have been depicted as he was a popular figure in Cypriot iconography.

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