Two figures, the personifications of Earth and Sea, occupy the upper zone of the northern semidome of the narthex. The depictions contain two young people covered with crowns. Almost always, the figures are female corresponding to the gender of their names. The Earth sits on the back of a lion, portrayed frontally, moving eastwards within a rocky surrounding. She holds the tail of a serpent while its head ends to a goblet. In the mountainous environment trees, birds, a serpent and a feline, in other words creatures to be found on earth, are painted.
The Sea is pictured sitting on a sea monster and holding a sailing boat and a paddle. Additionally, fish and octopus are drawn by the painter within the sea.
Traditionally, Earth and Sea are to be placed near the trumpet-blowing angels on the western wall. However, at Asinou these were intentionally located above the Kingdom of Heaven functioning as cosmological symbols.
The depiction of Sea as a figure within an iconographic program of a church can be found already in early Cypriot examples of the Second Coming such as in Saint Nicholas of the Roof at Kakopetria dated to the twelfth century and in the church of the Transfiguration at Sotira dated to the late thirteenth century.

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In the central zone of the northern semidome of the narthex, the Garden of Paradise is painted. The scene contains the locked gate leading to Paradise with a guardian cherub in front of it. Also, a number of the Elect walk towards it, with Peter as their leader. Behind him there is an elder person, probably prophet Elijah, and two martyrs, probably Demetrios and George. On the left hand side of the gate, the Garden of Paradise filled with trees is depicted within a rectangular compartment. On each side of the Mother of God, the thief, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are portrayed.
The appearance of the good thief in the scene of the Garden of Paradise is of particular interest. Although being sinful and crucified along with Jesus and the impenitent thief, he is depicted stepping into paradise as a symbol of salvation due to his repentance while being on the cross by asking Jesus to remember him during the Second Coming. From the eleventh century onwards, the thief is represented constantly in Last Judgement scenes. On the contrary, the impenitent thief challenged Christ to save himself in order to prove his divine substance.
Patriarchs are depicted frontally with a great degree of similarity among them with a group of souls in each of their himation. The souls are pictured as young people with their heads turned to the east. Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are traditionally included in the representation of the Last Judgement as early as the tenth century. However, they gained popularity in the eastern Mediterranean art during the Crusader period in accordance with the publicity their tombs in Hebron acquired. As a result, Palestinian churches of the twelfth century included them in their iconographical programme. They were, also, famous in Cyprus during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as an integral ingredient in the depictions of the Second Coming. The church of Transfiguration at Sotira and Panagia Kanakaria at Lythrankomi are exceptional.

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Laurentios is one of the monks-donors included in the iconographic program of the narthex of Asinou. He stands next to Saint Sozomenos, on the east respond, and is depicted turned east to the side of Virgin Phorviotisa. He is portrayed in the customary dark-grey tunic with girdle and is short enough that the black boots can be seen. He also wears a black kukulion. The accompanying inscriptions read: 'Prayer of the servant of God Laurentios the monk'.

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The Monk Leontios, one of the donors, is depicted in a confined panel, on the left hand side of Archangel Michael in the north conch of the narthex of Asinu.
According to his occupation, he is dressed in a dark grey tunic with a belt, a black hood and a pair of black boots. His face evidences an elder man with white beard and wrinkles.
Deviating from the norm, Monk Leontios turns his face and raises his hands in a prayer to the figure next to him, Archangel Michael, and not to Virgin Phorviotisa as the remainder of the monks-donors do in the narthex. This can be merely explained by Leontios’s age and Michael’s duty to accompany the souls of the deceased to Hades as psychopomp. The accompanied description reads : 'Prayer of the servant of God Leontios the monk'.

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Archangel Michael flanks the eastern side of the northern door of the narthex. He is a popular figure among the Orthodox people, even today.
His depiction stands out from the representations of the other holy figures in the narthex. He is pictured wearing imperial uniform and stands on a cushion. He holds a staff, the lower end of which forms a lance and its upper end reminisces a sceptre in the form of a double lily. Loros, the wrapped scarf around Michael’s body, seems adjoined with the lower decorated edge of his tunic.
On the left side of the figure, a large spot on the present layer has been destroyed. Thus, the subject layer was revealed, attesting that again the figure of Archangel Michael was depicted on the exact same position, although in a larger scale. Analyses carried out in the subjected layer prove that this layer was painted not long before the layer of 1332 A.D. . Therefore, it is legitimate to assume that the earlier representation might be an ex-voto from a particular donor.
Michael’s duties, as well as those of other archangels and angels, range between being God’s servant assisting him constantly in heaven and spreading His will to humans. Other duties include the protection of the faithful from Satan and also protecting churches. Thus the placement of the figure of Michael in churches is strategic. He is placed either in the narthex as at Asinou or close to or facing the entrance doors. Additionally he is connected to the dead as a companion of souls to Hades. Lastly, it is believed that Archangel Michael functions as an arbitrator between humankind and God. Several hymns ask for his contribution to the salvation of the souls of the deceased and pictography represents archangels participating in the Last Judgement, as in the vault of the narthex at Asinou. Therefore, he is a figure matching perfectly the iconographic program of the narthex.

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Monk Babylas is depicted on the west responds of the north arch between Saint Evdokia and Marina. He is turned to the east with his hands raised towards Saint Marina. Babylas is dressed in a dark grey tunic and a black hood. The accompanying label reads : prayer of the servant of God Babylas the monk.

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Saints Cosmas and Damian, the so-called Anargyroi, decorate the zone west of the northern door of the narthex. They were twin brothers, therefore the garments which they are depicted with are identical. The same applies for their insignia, a medicine box and a lancet and the way they hold them.
Cosmas and Damian were called unmercenary because as doctors they were offering their medical services without accepting payment from patients. Cosmas and Damian are among the most popular saints, a fact that complicated the hagiographical stories regarding them and led to the mention of three pairs of Anargyroi in the synaxarion of Constantinopolitan church. The original pair, according to scholars, were born in Arabia, studied medicine in Syria and tortured to death under the reign of Diocletian.
In the Menaia, the two saints are commemorated as body and soul healers and along with the earlier portrait of Anastasia Pharmakolytria, they are linked to the message of redemption and salvation expressed in the narthex of Asinu. Last but not least, another interplay exists between them: Saint Mamas and the inscription of hippiatros accompanying the portrait of Saint George based on their ability to save not only humans but also animals.

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The portrait of Saint Marina is located on the northern semidome of the narthex, next to Cosmas and Damianus.
Marina is a universal saint, venerated both in the Latin and Orthodox church. The Latin church venerates her as Saint Margaret. She lived in Antioch, Pisidia and was martyred during the reign of Emperor Diocletian in the third century.
At Asinοu, Marina is depicted in her traditional Byzantine iconographic representation, wearing a red maphorion and holding the cross of martyrdom in her right hand. One may observe that the portraits of Saints Marina, Evdokia and Anna in the narthex of Asinοu are to be identified as identical figures.
Marina of Pisidia is frequently confused with Marina of Syria. Both saints were depicted on the columns of the Basilica of the Nativity in Bethlehem accompanied by Greek and Latin inscriptions declaring the importance of their worship for the Latin and Orthodox population of the Crusader Levant.
Marina of Pisidia, apart from her popularity in the Crusader states and Sinai as stated, was also widely venerated in Cyprus. Her depiction in Cypriot churches, though, began during the course of the thirteenth century. The earlier examples are to be found at Panayia in Kofinu, at Mutulas and at Saint Herakleidios in the monastery of Saint John Lampadistes at Kalopanayiotis.
Even though her depiction at Asinοu might be the traditional one, a less popular one, the triumphal victory over Satan, may function as a salvific model and connecting her to the pictorial program of the narthex.

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On the upper band of the soffit on the northern arch, the choirs of the Elect appear. From west to east they are recognised as the Choir of the Hierarchs, the Choir of the Prophets, the Choir of the Blessed and the Choir of the Martyrs. These constitute the saints and the righteous.
Each panel contains twelve or thirteen figures depicted in full-length with their hands raised and facing north, towards the Paradise. Saint John Chrysostom and Basil, as authors of liturgies, lead the way of the hierarchs, while Gregory of Nazianzus follows them. A brown-haired and bearded figure, probably Moses, and an elder man, probably Elijah, are seen to be the most prominent personalities of the choir of the prophets. An anchorite and an elderly monk are depicted leading the saints, dressed in a straw garment and kukulion, cloak and analabos, respectively. The martyrs George and Theodore are portrayed in the first row on the panel of the blessed.
The depiction of the groups of the Elect in rows as an iconographic tradition has its roots in the middle Byzantine period which also survived in the Palaiologan era. It is unusual, though, that at Asinou the scenes of the Elect do not appear on the right side of the prepared throne but on the left. In any case, they are depicted according to the norm, on the right hand side of the Pantokrator and Christ the Merciful.

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The figure of Saint Evdokia as part of a monumental painting program in Cyprus is rather a unicum.
Evdokia’s life comes in agreement with the salvific context of the narthex. This is probably the reason she was chosen instead of the other two saints who share the same name with her. She is commemorated on 1st of March as a martyr in the Orthodox Church. She was a beautiful woman, taking advantage of her charm, as a prostitute. She later repented and converted to Christianity, changing her life drastically to austere penance. According to her Vita, she was able to perform resurrection miracles and along with the weight given to penitence and redemption in the Menaion on her feast day, contributes to the promotion of the principal message conveyed through every depiction, salvation.

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