In the early Byzantine period gold and silversmiths devoted much of their time to producing crosses, chalices, icons and other liturgical items. However as prosperity grew the demand for jewellery for personal adornment gave the craftsmen new opportunities to create more ornate and elaborate designs such as gemstone encrusted necklaces, bracelets and earrings in gold and silver. Jewellery was meant to enhance the beauty or emphasize the status or rank of the wearer. Since ancient times, the craftsmen of Cyprus have produced work of high quality including filigree, a technique that requires considerable skill.

Collection


In the early Byzantine period gold and silversmiths devoted much of their time to producing crosses, chalices, icons and other liturgical items. However as prosperity grew the demand for jewellery for personal adornment gave the craftsmen new opportunities to create more ornate and elaborate designs such as gemstone encrusted necklaces, bracelets and earrings in gold and silver. Jewellery was meant to enhance the beauty or emphasize the status or rank of the wearer. Since ancient times, the craftsmen of Cyprus have produced work of high quality including filigree, a technique that requires considerable skill.

Collection


In the early Byzantine period gold and silversmiths devoted much of their time to producing crosses, chalices, icons and other liturgical items. However as prosperity grew the demand for jewellery for personal adornment gave the craftsmen new opportunities to create more ornate and elaborate designs such as gemstone encrusted necklaces, bracelets and earrings in gold and silver. Jewellery was meant to enhance the beauty or emphasize the status or rank of the wearer. Since ancient times, the craftsmen of Cyprus have produced work of high quality including filigree, a technique that requires considerable skill.

Collection


Here we have a view of the Dhiarizos river meaning two roots, which flows for 26 miles from the Troodos mountains through the picturesque valleys of the Paphos district reaching its estuary in the Kouklia area of Paleopaphos. The government with its policy of preservation and management of the island's water resources built a 14.5 km long tunnel to divert the waters to the Kouris dam, the largest in Cyprus with a capacity of 115 million cubic meters.

Collection


Once upon a time, the crab and the fox decided to sow in partnership all the fields of Athalassa. When the time came to reap, they went to the fields and as soon as they began reaping the fox raised such a howl that the crab was terrified. What is the matter asked the crab? Some stones have rolled and it seems that that colossal rock is about to roll down and kill us, said the fox as he pointed to it on the hill. What shall we do asked the crab? I will tell you partner; I will go and hold the rock so we do not feel uneasy about anything happening to the wheat, or to us and you will do the reaping. Your idea is good said the crab, and so be it. When the reaping was completed, the fox, claiming that he got very tired, said that he should get all the wheat and the crab all the straw. The crab, then replying that he too had worked hard under the bright sun and was exhausted, counter proposed that they race and whoever gets first to the heap of wheat will win. The fox gave the signal and at the very moment that he got ready to run, the crab, in one leap, got hold of his tail. When the fox reached the heap he turned round to see where the crab was. Right then the crab let go the fox’s tail and leaping onto the heap began shouting with joy that he had won. From then on the straw became the fox’s home and the people say that the good wheat is like the eye of the crab. According to Nicos Politis this fable is universal.
(Extract from: Nearchos Clerides, Animal stories of Cyprus)

Collection


Once upon a time, the crab and the fox decided to sow in partnership all the fields of Athalassa. When the time came to reap, they went to the fields and as soon as they began reaping the fox raised such a howl that the crab was terrified. What is the matter asked the crab? Some stones have rolled and it seems that that colossal rock is about to roll down and kill us, said the fox as he pointed to it on the hill. What shall we do asked the crab? I will tell you partner; I will go and hold the rock so we do not feel uneasy about anything happening to the wheat, or to us and you will do the reaping. Your idea is good said the crab, and so be it. When the reaping was completed, the fox, claiming that he got very tired, said that he should get all the wheat and the crab all the straw. The crab, then replying that he too had worked hard under the bright sun and was exhausted, counter proposed that they race and whoever gets first to the heap of wheat will win. The fox gave the signal and at the very moment that he got ready to run, the crab, in one leap, got hold of his tail. When the fox reached the heap he turned round to see where the crab was. Right then the crab let go the fox’s tail and leaping onto the heap began shouting with joy that he had won. From then on the straw became the fox’s home and the people say that the good wheat is like the eye of the crab. According to Nicos Politis this fable is universal. (Extract from: Nearchos Clerides, Animal stories of Cyprus)

Collection


Once upon a time, the crab and the fox decided to sow in partnership all the fields of Athalassa. When the time came to reap, they went to the fields and as soon as they began reaping the fox raised such a howl that the crab was terrified. What is the matter asked the crab? Some stones have rolled and it seems that that colossal rock is about to roll down and kill us, said the fox as he pointed to it on the hill. What shall we do asked the crab? I will tell you partner; I will go and hold the rock so we do not feel uneasy about anything happening to the wheat, or to us and you will do the reaping. Your idea is good said the crab, and so be it. When the reaping was completed, the fox, claiming that he got very tired, said that he should get all the wheat and the crab all the straw. The crab, then replying that he too had worked hard under the bright sun and was exhausted, counter proposed that they race and whoever gets first to the heap of wheat will win. The fox gave the signal and at the very moment that he got ready to run, the crab, in one leap, got hold of his tail. When the fox reached the heap he turned round to see where the crab was. Right then the crab let go the fox’s tail and leaping onto the heap began shouting with joy that he had won. From then on the straw became the fox’s home and the people say that the good wheat is like the eye of the crab. According to Nicos Politis this fable is universal.
(Extract from: Nearchos Clerides, Animal stories of Cyprus)

Collection


Since times immemorial men and women have used beads and jewellery to adorn themselves and to express social standing as well as religious beliefs. In all cultures beads and jewellery were not only traded but kept as movable assets especially in times of conflict when people had to flee their homes to find safety elsewhere. Amber, a yellow translucent fossil resin, may have been the earliest gemlike material to be used in jewellery. Amber pendants from the Magdalenian culture (15,000-10,000 B.C.) in France and Spain have been discovered. In Cyprus a stone and shell necklace from the 7th millennium B.C. was discovered at Khoirokitia. This now in the Cyprus Museum in Nicosia.

Collection


Since times immemorial men and women have used beads and jewellery to adorn themselves and to express social standing as well as religious beliefs. In all cultures beads and jewellery were not only traded but kept as movable assets especially in times of conflict when people had to flee their homes to find safety elsewhere. Amber, a yellow translucent fossil resin, may have been the earliest gemlike material to be used in jewellery. Amber pendants from the Magdalenian culture (15,000-10,000 B.C.) in France and Spain have been discovered. In Cyprus a stone and shell necklace from the 7th millennium B.C. was discovered at Khoirokitia. This now in the Cyprus Museum in Nicosia.

Collection