Frontally illustrated are two panels of saints which flank either side of the western door, leading from the naos to the narthex. The figures of these monks belong to the original wall-painting programme, as does the western side of the naos. All six Saints represent the monasticism movement, as each one of them during the course of their lives experienced the eremitic life. On the right hand side, Saints Andronicus, Hilarion and Cyriacus are represented and on the left hand side Saints Anthony, Euthymius and Savvas.

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Saint Onouphrios occupies the lower zone of the added north respond of the naos and dates along with Nikephoros and Symeon to the sixteenth century. Along with Onouphrios, above him are ascetic saints. Presumably the familiarity of the monastic community of Asinou with them must explain their inclusion in the iconographic cycle of the church

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The sail vault of the narthex is decorated with the figure of Christ in the iconographic type of Pantokrator, the Supreme Judge. The wall-painting was part of the narthex’s decorative composition with the concept of the Last Judgement spread across every wall, except the conch of the south wall. This imagery, along with the series of medallions and the apostles depicted in the pendentives, consists of an unusual alteration of the well-established representation of Heavenly Court, the central composition of the Last Judgement. However, the iconographic wall-painting ornamentation of the narthex, still evokes a typical dome composition.
These frescoes are dated to 1332 A.D. and their imagery corresponds to the scripture, homilies and poetic work of the Last Judgement.

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Pantokrator is surrounded by twelve medallions located at a lower level than Him which contain the Mother of God, the archangels Michael and Gabriel, a seraph and eight more angels.
The presence of each figure in the medallions serves a purpose. Angels Kain and Galgaliel escort the Pantokrator, Tartaruhos is an angel-demon and master of the torments in hell, Teptadael is an angel serving the Just and Saltael is thought to be a supplicant par excellence. Therefore, the Pantokrator is encircled by angels serving as escorts and extollers of God, by angels connected to cosmological symbolism and by angels directly associated with the Second Coming, who keep the Just and Unjust and supplicate God for mercy. The Virgin, depicted with raised hands in supplication, and every angel address their entreaty to the Christ for the redemption of humankind.
This imagery, along with the Pantokrator and the Apostles depicted in the pendentives, consists of an unusual alteration of the well-established representation of Heavenly Court, the central composition of the Last Judgement.

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Traditionally in the composition of the Last Judgement, Apostles adjoin Christ the Judge alongside with Virgin and John the Baptist but at Asinu a deviation is attested. The Apostles are dispersed to the four pendentives of the sail vault of the narthex in groups of three. On the NorthEast pendentive the Apostles Simon, James and Philip are depicted, on the SouthEast pendentive the Apostles Peter, Paul and Luke are shown, on the SouthWest pendentive the Apostles Matthew, Mark and John are situated and on the NorthWest pendentive the Apostles Andrew, Thomas and Bartholomew. They are enthroned ready to judge the twelve tribes of Israel on the Day of Judgement as part of the Heavenly Court. Regarding the figures, a cohesion is embedded through colour, design, gestures and postures of the Apostles.

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In the narthex of Asinou Saint Sozomenos is pictured on the west face of the northeast respond as a monk. The Saint is connected with Cyprus but in the hagiographical texts there are three saints with the same name, thus making it difficult to discern which of them is linked to the island. Probably all three of them have bonds with Cyprus, each one in a different part. The most intriguing of the three is Saint Sozomenos who lived as hermit in close vicinity to the village of Potamia. Interestingly, the latest layer of frescoes in his cave depicts Sozomenos in the same prosopographical type as that in Asinu and is dated to the second quarter of the fourteenth century. This means that the two pictoral programs have a small time gap between them and therefore a similarity is expected.
Saint Sozomenos of Potamia, like every figure in the narthex of Asinou, was not chosen by chance. He is commemorated on 21st of November, the same day the Virgin is presented to the Temple. In this way he is related to Mary. Additionally, in a service composed in his honor, an encomium is written for his healing abilities and he is continuously asked to intervene for the salvation of the faithful. His name, also, can be associated with what the narthex promotes, deriving from the verb 'sozo' which means 'to save', a direct connotation of the salvific context of the frescoes of the narthex. Thus these connotations contribute to the promotion of the general message of the narthex of Asinou.

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Two figures, the personifications of Earth and Sea, occupy the upper zone of the northern semidome of the narthex. The depictions contain two young people covered with crowns. Almost always, the figures are female corresponding to the gender of their names. The Earth sits on the back of a lion, portrayed frontally, moving eastwards within a rocky surrounding. She holds the tail of a serpent while its head ends to a goblet. In the mountainous environment trees, birds, a serpent and a feline, in other words creatures to be found on earth, are painted.
The Sea is pictured sitting on a sea monster and holding a sailing boat and a paddle. Additionally, fish and octopus are drawn by the painter within the sea.
Traditionally, Earth and Sea are to be placed near the trumpet-blowing angels on the western wall. However, at Asinou these were intentionally located above the Kingdom of Heaven functioning as cosmological symbols.
The depiction of Sea as a figure within an iconographic program of a church can be found already in early Cypriot examples of the Second Coming such as in Saint Nicholas of the Roof at Kakopetria dated to the twelfth century and in the church of the Transfiguration at Sotira dated to the late thirteenth century.

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In the central zone of the northern semidome of the narthex, the Garden of Paradise is painted. The scene contains the locked gate leading to Paradise with a guardian cherub in front of it. Also, a number of the Elect walk towards it, with Peter as their leader. Behind him there is an elder person, probably prophet Elijah, and two martyrs, probably Demetrios and George. On the left hand side of the gate, the Garden of Paradise filled with trees is depicted within a rectangular compartment. On each side of the Mother of God, the thief, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are portrayed.
The appearance of the good thief in the scene of the Garden of Paradise is of particular interest. Although being sinful and crucified along with Jesus and the impenitent thief, he is depicted stepping into paradise as a symbol of salvation due to his repentance while being on the cross by asking Jesus to remember him during the Second Coming. From the eleventh century onwards, the thief is represented constantly in Last Judgement scenes. On the contrary, the impenitent thief challenged Christ to save himself in order to prove his divine substance.
Patriarchs are depicted frontally with a great degree of similarity among them with a group of souls in each of their himation. The souls are pictured as young people with their heads turned to the east. Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are traditionally included in the representation of the Last Judgement as early as the tenth century. However, they gained popularity in the eastern Mediterranean art during the Crusader period in accordance with the publicity their tombs in Hebron acquired. As a result, Palestinian churches of the twelfth century included them in their iconographical programme. They were, also, famous in Cyprus during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as an integral ingredient in the depictions of the Second Coming. The church of Transfiguration at Sotira and Panagia Kanakaria at Lythrankomi are exceptional.

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Laurentios is one of the monks-donors included in the iconographic program of the narthex of Asinou. He stands next to Saint Sozomenos, on the east respond, and is depicted turned east to the side of Virgin Phorviotisa. He is portrayed in the customary dark-grey tunic with girdle and is short enough that the black boots can be seen. He also wears a black kukulion. The accompanying inscriptions read: 'Prayer of the servant of God Laurentios the monk'.

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The Monk Leontios, one of the donors, is depicted in a confined panel, on the left hand side of Archangel Michael in the north conch of the narthex of Asinu.
According to his occupation, he is dressed in a dark grey tunic with a belt, a black hood and a pair of black boots. His face evidences an elder man with white beard and wrinkles.
Deviating from the norm, Monk Leontios turns his face and raises his hands in a prayer to the figure next to him, Archangel Michael, and not to Virgin Phorviotisa as the remainder of the monks-donors do in the narthex. This can be merely explained by Leontios’s age and Michael’s duty to accompany the souls of the deceased to Hades as psychopomp. The accompanied description reads : 'Prayer of the servant of God Leontios the monk'.

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