Below Prophet Isaiah, on the lower part of the soffit of the eastern arch of the narthex, the monk Germanos is depicted. He wears a brown tunic, not long, with a waistband under which another brown garment is worn. He also wears a pair of black boots and his head is covered with a black kukulion. His posture and hands are turned to the Panagia Phorviotisa, placed on the tympanum of the eastern arch of the narthex. The accompanying inscription reads: 'Prayer of the servant of God Germanos the monk'.

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Saint John of Damascus is depicted next to the Virgin, on the lowest part of the soffit on the eastern arch of the narthex. His head is slightly turned to her and his right hand also points that way. His garments indicate his property as a monk. He is dressed with a pallion over a tunic, kukulion, cloak, and an analabos is hanging in front of his body. He also wears a turban on his head, evidence of his origin.
John holds an open scroll. He is popular for his theological writing and also the hymns he wrote, contributing to the formation of the Oktoihos or Paraklitiki. He is portrayed in a few other Cypriot Byzantine churches and also, in the central nave of Asinu, on the layer dated to the thirteenth century.
The full text of the canon is "What praiseworthy ode will our weakness offer to you other than the cheerful one into which Gabriel initiated us? Rejoice, You who gave birth to God, Virgin, unmarried Mother". Clearly John is connected on many levels with the Virgin in Asinu. He is depicted next to her on the narthex pointing and glancing at her, through the inscription on his scroll canon referring to her and the incarnation, is sung on Sunday morning in the first mode and contextually, as a hymnographer of Mary.
John of Damascus ‘fits’ perfectly the iconographic connotations of the narthex of Asinu. Either by his hymns which are sung in the funerary service, taking place in the narthex of a Byzantine church and, therefore, linked to the funerary program of the Asinu narthex or by ecclesiastical hymns sung during vesper service of the date of his commemoration which ask him to intervene for the salvation of the souls. A particular hymn sung during the orthros service of 4th of December politely asks John to serves as a mediator through his hymns with the prayers of several saints, the Virgin, Saint John the Forerunner, the apostles, the prophets, the ascetics, the hierarch, the Just and the martyrs, In other words, for all saints included in the frescoes of the narthex. Thus, John of Damascus is associated with Mary and foremost, with the Deesis and its intercessional context.

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The Prophet Isaiah is portrayed on the north side of the soffit above the doorway leading from the naos to the narthex. He is depicted as an old man with long grey hair, holding a scroll. The scroll passage is extracted by his book I:19 and reads: "If you are willing and obedient, you shall eat the good of the land". The inscription’s message contradicts and is cancelled by the new commandment, to love one another, written on the book of Christ who is depicted below. Thus humankind from this time onwards does not have to obey and obtain the goods of the earth so as to secure eternal salvation of the soul but to love each other.

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Monk Theophilos is pictured on the lower part of the soffit of the eastern arch of the narthex. Reference to Theophilos is made in the dedicatory inscription as one of the main donor supported by the common people. His body is turned towards Virgin Phorviotisa but his eyes and glance turn to the side of the observer.
His tunic and undergarment are dark grey and brown, respectively. Both are fastened by a black belt with a metallic buckle while the folded triangles indicate that the tunic had a front opening. The length of his tunic is remarkably short with this resulting in a part of his legs being exposed along with his pointed, black and white boots. The monk Theophilos has his head covered with a kukulion. The inscription that accompanies his figure reads: 'The servant of God Theophilos the monk is dead, and those who look at this pray to the Lord, amen'.

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Saint John the Forerunner, is depicted on the lowest part of the southern side of the soffit on the eastern arch of the narthex. Along with Christ and Virgin the Merciful constitute an iconographic Deesis. Nevertheless, traditionally John is placed next to the Virgin and not next to Jesus as in Asinou. Christ, though, is perceived equally to Mary.
John is dressed in a grey goatskin with sleeves and a scarf knotted in front. His posture declares respect towards Christ as his head is inclined. He blesses with his right hand and on his left he holds an open scroll. On the scroll the following passage, extracted from Matthew 3:2 and 4:17, is written: 'Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near'. Its message emphasises repentance during the course of our life, the most determining precondition for the salvation of the soul. This message is in great accordance with the meaning of Deesis and the Second Coming.
Contextualising Deesis in the whole iconographic program of the narthex of Asinou, it functions as a key image either by its placement, the selection of inscriptions or the gestures of each figure and serves a number of roles. Firstly it is part of the Last Judgement. Then it copies the iconography of the Deesis on the templon and sets zones of prayer and gradual holiness from the narthex to the church. And lastly, Deesis has the role of the recipient of the intercessions of the saints depicted in the narthex, the individuals or groups of donors portrayed on the walls, the brotherhood of the monastery and every person participating in the services. These roles can be enclosed within the cyclical procedure of response. John preaches that the Kingdom of Heaven will not be late and evokes the humankind that only though repentance they will earn a place in Heaven. Mary, on the other hand, asks from her son the salvation of humans and, in turn, Christ gives back a new command, to love one another, as a precondition. Therefore, if those commands are fulfilled, then Jesus, Eleemon as He is, will show mercy and will bless the faithful.

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Strangely enough for an Orthodox church, mouflons and hounds are depicted in the triangular space between the Virgin and monk Theophilos. The two mouflons stand in a steep landscape and two hounds are tied to a spear and each is turned to the figure of Theophilos as being their owner. In support of this theory, the short vestments, the striped boots and the opening in front of the tunic were worn by hunters, farmers and soldiers in the West or by Latin people. Therefore, they may indicate that indeed Theophilos was their master. Consequently, the fact that the garments of every monk portrayed in Asinou deviate from the norm, points to the theory that the brotherhood of the monastery had agrarian and hunting activities and was breeding livestock.

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Our Lady Phorviotisa is pictured on the tympanum of the eastern arch above the door leading from the central bay to the narthex. It is for the first time who is mentioned with her descriptive designation ‘Phorviotisa’. She is shown with hands raised in prayer and Christ as a child in front of her within a medallion. In this way, the doctrine of the Incarnation of the Word of God is showed. The particular iconographic type can see its roots in an icon located in the Vlachernon Monastery in Constantinople.

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The placement of hieromonk and donor Barnabas adjacent to the image of Our Lady Phorviotisa, next to the entrance door and above the Deesis, highlights his contribution in the fresco program of Asinou.
He is depicted with his head lifted and hands raised towards the Virgin. As a monk, his head is tonsured and he is clad in a white sticharion and a white phelonion. The cuffs and the epitrachelion have gold and pearl embroideries. The accompanying inscription reads: prayer of the servant of God Barnabas priestmonk, amen.
The distinctive use of white for the garments of Barnabas has a semantic meaning. Priests wear white vestments on specific dates, including the period between Easter and the Ascension. If this is the case and Barnabas wears white garments in this period, it represents an indirect reference to the Resurrection and the salvation of humankind and is in accordance with the message conveyed through the fresco program of the narthex.

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Christ is depicted on the left hand side of the entrance from the narthex to the naos. Along with His mother who is portrayed on the right side of the entrance and John the Forerunner painted next to Jesus this create a Deesis. Deesis constitutes an integral part of the iconographic representation of the Last Judgement functioning as intercessor. Concurrently, the placement of these three important figures of Christianity in the lower band of frescoes in the narthex which traditionally includes depictions inspired by the sanctoral cycle, strengthens the saints’ prayers for the salvation of humankind.
Christ is portrayed frontally holding an open codex on His left hand and blessing with His right. On each side of His halo there are his sigla and His characterisation, Jesus Christ the Merciful.
The text written on the codex quotes John 13:34: 'I give you a new commandment that you love one another and ranges on the same theme, the Salvation, as texts on Christ’s book in other Cypriot churches'. One can think that the present text and the inscription appearing on the north wall of the narthex accompanying the scenes of the paradise are linked and together convey the message that through loving and helping each other, we will secure a place in Paradise. This is the explanation for Christ entitled as merciful.
Contextualising Deesis in the whole iconographic program of the narthex of Asinou, it functions as a key image either by its placement, the selection of inscriptions or the gestures of each figure and serves a number of roles. Firstly it is part of the Last Judgement. Then it copies the iconography of the Deesis on the templon and sets zones of prayer and gradual holiness from the narthex to the church. And lastly, Deesis has the role of the recipient of the intercessions of the saints depicted in the narthex, the individuals or groups of donors portrayed on the walls, the brotherhood of the monastery and every person participating in the services. These roles can be enclosed with the cyclical procedure of response. John preaches that the Kingdom of Heaven will not be late and evokes the humankind that only though repentance they will earn a place in Heaven. Mary, on the other hand, asks from her son the salvation of humans and, in turn, Christ gives back a new command, to love one another, as a precondition. Therefore, if those commands are fulfilled, then Jesus, Eleemon as He is, will show mercy and will bless the faithful.

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Theotokos is placed on the left hand side of the entrance from the naos to the narthex. Along with her son who is portrayed on the right side of the entrance and John the Forerunner, painted next to Jesus, they create a Deesis. Deesis constitutes an integral part of the iconographic representation of the Last Judgement functioning as an intercessor. Concurrently, the placement of these three important figures of Christianity in the lower band of frescoes in the narthex which traditionally includes depictions inspired by the sanctoral cycle, strengths the saints’ prayers for the salvation of the humankind.
The portrait of Virgin has been painted over the initial fresco layer which is visible on the lower right corner.
The same representation motif can be seen flanking the bema, leading to a visual correlation between the two. The Virgin has turned to her son, holding an open scroll, and her sigla Mother of God the merciful, depicted on each side of her halo. Her iconographic form is of the Intercession type as she is the principle figure serving as median between Christ and humankind.
The text of the scroll she holds contains a two-verse dialogue with Christ asking for redemption. However, she does not seem literally to speak. The poem is written in the third person, driving you mentally to a meeting with her and Christ. The written text is: 'The Virgin offers her motherly entreaties, she steers him toward the salvation of mortals'. As has been noted through the poem depicted on the scroll at Asinou the Virgin intervenes with her son on behalf of each supplicant depicted on the church’s frescoes to ask for their salvation.
Contextualising Deesis in the whole iconographic program of the narthex of Asinou, it functions as a key image either by its placement, the selection of inscriptions or the gestures of each figure and serves a number of roles. Firstly it is part of the Last Judgement. Then it copies the iconography of the Deesis on the templon and sets zones of prayer and gradual holiness from the narthex to the church. And lastly, Deesis has the role of the recipient of the intercessions of the saints depicted in the narthex, the individuals or groups of donors portrayed on the walls, the brotherhood of the monastery and every person participating in the services. These roles can be enclosed with the cyclical procedure of response. John preaches that the Kingdom of Heaven will not be late and evokes in humankind that only though repentance will they earn a place in Heaven. Mary, on the other hand, asks from her son the salvation of humans and, in turn, Christ gives back a new command, to love one another, as a precondition. Therefore, if those commands are fulfilled, then Jesus Eleemon as He is, will show mercy and will bless the faithful.

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