On the north jamb of the west door of the narthex, apotropaic crosses with a waived crown of thorns and cryptograms are represented.
The cross is in brown colour and the letters in black. Both are painted in a white background.
Cross as a pattern has a prophylactic function against evil powers. Thus its presence on the doorway seems legit.
Regarding the cryptograms written on the jambs of the narthex, praise the sacrifice of Christ on the cross, his mercy, attest the faith of the martyrs and underline the eschatological and salvific meaning of the cross .

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The multi-scene composition over the western doorway of the narthex conveys the message of the Last Judgement, as does the entire wall-painting program of the narthex.
On the upper part of the lunette, the Preparation of the Throne depicted. In front of it a double-armed cross stands with the crown of the thorns and in front of these are the gospel book and the Holy Spirit pictured as a white dove. On both sides of the cross, the spear, the sponge and the sigla of Christ, are illustrated reminiscing the Passion. A red mandorla bearing eyes and wings surrounds the throne while and Eve kneel and raise their hands. The Holy Trinity is symbolised with the throne, the cross and the Gospel book and the dove
The polysemic composition bears multiple meanings on different levels with the most prominent being the eschatological one.
On the central part of the left side of the lunette, the Fiery Stream is represented. An entirely painted-in-red angel pushes a group of sinners to the flames with a trident. On the front line there is a king, a queen, lori and three hierarchs. The inscriptions written, read: place the sinners into the fire and the fiery stream. The Fiery Stream refers indirectly to the Second Coming as in a homily accredited to Hippolytos, another homily addressed to Emperor Constantine the 5th and in the Apocalypse of Anastasia.
On the left corner of the lunette, Hades is personified as a naked winged man riding a monster with an inscription: the insatiable Hades.
On the right side of the lunette a Trumpeting Angel is figured. In front of the angel, there is an empty sarcophagus and two groups of souls within clouds. The souls are personified as children dressed in white garments and with covered heads. The inscription cites the epistle of Paul towards the Thessalonians 4:17 reads: we will be caught up together with them in the clouds.

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Timotheos and Mavra are the saints portrayed in the north of the western door of the narthex.
Saint Timotheos appears as a young beardless man holding the cross of the martyrs and a codex. Codex is his attribute because, according to his Vita, while he was an ecclesiastical reader in a town in Upper Egypt, he refused to obey the commander of the province to burn the sacred books. Therefore, Timotheos and his wife were condemned to death in 286 A.D.
According to the synaxarion of the Constantinopolitan church, Timotheos and Mavra did not have any relation to Cyprus. A local tradition, though, says that the two saints were martyred in Cyprus.
Regarding Saint Mavra, in Cypriot iconography she is depicted both alone and along with her husband.

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On the right lower part of the west wall of the narthex, next to the western door, Saint Anna and her benefactress, Anna Lahana, are depicted. Saint Anna was incorporated in several iconographic programs in churches in Cyprus, either included in the Mariological cycle as the mother of Virgin Mary or portrayed with her husband, Joachim. Nonetheless, Anna was seldom portrayed on her own. In Cyprus, only at Asinou and the church of Saint Mamas at Luvaras, dated to 1495, she is represented isolated.
The two female figures are portrayed in a rectangular panel with a dark blue background. Saint Anna is painted holding a cross, even though she did not die as a martyr. It appears that by the Middle Byzantine period, painters attributed to her the cross and the red-coloured maphorion.
Saint Anna was not only the selection of her homonymous donor, expressing her piety, but was also in line with the salvific iconographic program of the narthex of Asinou. Specifically, despite her relation to fertility and giving birth, Anna as the mother of Virgin was worshipped for her contribution to the incarnation of Christ and therefore as a key character for the salvation of humankind.
Anna Lahana, the donor of the portrait, is represented in a smaller scale with raised hands towards her patron saint in gesture of pleading. The accompanying inscription reads: 'Prayer of the servant of God Anna of Lahanas'. Anna wears a white long dress, tighter on the upper part, with long sleeves. Red and black geometrical patterns decorate the cuffs and the collar of her dress imitating woven garments. In addition, a long black mantle covers her from the top of the head and is loosely adhered by two red ribbons fastened on red patches. A white headdress wraps her hair and neck and is decorated with woven parallel red bands.
Donor Anna wears garments that reflect the local clothing tradition and production. Anastasia Saramalina’s garment has the same ribbons which are attached to rectangular patches on the cloth and hold loosely the mantle. Anna’s headdress is also worn in the same way by a deceased woman in the church of the Holy Cross at Pelendri. This is aligned with the late medieval directive according to which contemporary fabrics could be depicted in lay and religious scenes. Lastly, regarding the thriving weaving craft in Cyprus at that time, the type of embroidered ornaments of Anna’s garments seem to be a prosperous local production which has been maintained until today, especially in the village of Fyti. For this, the name of these textiles is fythkiotika.

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On the south portal of the west door of the narthex prophylactic crosses with a waived crown of thorns and cryptograms are shown.
The cross operates as apotropaic symbols to evil powers. Therefore its depiction on the doorstep had a reasonable meaning.
The cryptograms written on the jambs of the narthex underline the sacrifice of Jesus though the cross, his charity and operate as signs of the faith of the martyrs but also highlight the salvific and eschatological symbolism of the cross.

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On the soffit of the west arch of the narthex, two angels unfold the Scroll of Heaven. The Scroll is embellished with golden stars and two medallions containing two heads, the personified Moon and Sun. The accompanying inscription reads: the angels are rolling up the scroll of heaven, and the source of inspiration comes mainly from the book of Apocalypse, Isaiah and an extract of a homily on the Second Coming. Counterparts of the representation are attested at the same exact position in the church of Saint Nicolas of the Roof.

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On the southern half of the internal part of the west arch of the narthex, an angel sounding a trumpet is depicted. In front of him there is a group of sarcophagi from which two pairs of souls emerge. The first accompanying inscription reads: 'The trumpeting angel' and the second one: 'The dead rise'.

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On the western side of Saint Irene, a renowned saint is depicted. It is Saint Demetrios, a traditional military saint who at Asinou is portrayed in consular attire. It was the norm to be illustrated armoured on a horse or more frequently on foot. Thus his representation at Asinou as a martyr wearing the mantle and embroidered tunic of a dignitary is exceptional. The portrait is inspired by an early Christian custom which depicted Demetrios with his original occupation as a consul. His conversion to a military saint took place around the tenth century in Thessaloniki, his focal cult centre. From fourteenth century onward and during the whole Palaiologan period, when he was extensively venerated, it was uncommon for Demetrios to be depicted as a consul, even though in biographical scenes he usually wears tunic and mantle.

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On the soffit of the south arch of the narthex, depictions of the Torments of the Damned are placed.
On the western side, the representations refer to group punishments and they are developed within rectangulars. These are the worm that sleepeth not, the gnashing of teeth, Tartarus and the outer darkness. The group of people in each representation are discerned only via symbols and inscriptions such as white lines corresponding to worms in the panel of Worm that Sleepeth Not, visible teeth for the scene of the Gnashing Teeth, poor light in the scene of Tartarus and dark light for the Outer Darkness. An important detail is that the figures are turned to the centre of the narthex where Christ, the Supreme Judge, is pictured while raised eyebrows and brown brushstrokes on the face of the condemned declare grief and torture.
Regarding the subject of the scenes, these are mentioned in apocalyptic texts and church hymnography. The Worm, the Gnashing of Teeth and the Outer Darkness are representations drawn by the Gospels of Mark and Matthew and are sung again and again in troparia. However, Tartarus is an unusual appearance in iconography and hymnography.
In terms of iconography, the representation of the damned as a unified group, half lengthened as in Asinou, belongs to a long-standing tradition which is abandoned in the Palaiologan era. From this period on, the damned are represented in full length and separated.
By contrast, on the eastern side of the southern arch of the narthex, individual torments are represented. As on the opposite side, the four scenes are developed within square partitions and are identified as: he who ploughs over the boundaries and the dishonest miller, the thief and the slanderer, the usurer and falsifier of weights and the faithless nun, the faithless monk and the woman who refuses to nurse her children.
The figures are depicted naked, bounded by restraints and hanged over flames. The equipment, symbols and inscriptions which accompany the figures contribute to distinguish the identity of each one. In fact, those symbols and the message of each scene have a didactic purpose and an apotropaic impact to the agrarian congregation of Asinou.
Most possibly the selection of the specific individual sins portrayed in Asinou represents the rural and monastic environment of the Phorviotisa monastery. Counterparts in Venetian Crete, such as village churches, follow a common tradition depicting aspects of the local historical and social conditions such as crimes in an agrarian society.

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Saint Irene, the Daughter of Saint Spiridon, constitutes an iconographical unicum, attested only at Asinou church. She holds a cross, the characteristic feature of a martyr and wears a maphorion of brown and dark blue colours.
Information concerning her life are drawn exclusively from the Life of Saint Spiridon. According to the story, an unknown man handed over his personal valuable items to her before leaving on a journey. When he returned he was informed that Irini was dead and he was terrified that he lost all his belongings. Then he visited his father and Saint Spyridon went to her grave and called her back to life in order to indicate to him where she had buried his valuable things.
The explanation for choosing Saint Irini to be displayed in the narthex must be twofold. Primarily she is linked to the message of narthex’s iconographic program regarding the Second Coming and resurrection and secondly due to the fact that she is a local saint.

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