Eleonora’s Falcon takes its name from the Lusignan Queen Eleanor, wife of King Peter IV who reigned from 1345 to 1365. It is a migratory bird that visits Cyprus in the Spring and leaves in October though some may stay behind. It is capable of covering thousands of miles in its migrations. It breeds in the Canary Islands and North Western Morocco and winters in Madagascar, and eastern mainland Africa. It grows to a length of 38 cm. Falcons can be trained and used for hunting other birds and this practice has survived from the Middle Ages to our present times.
During Ottoman rule, The Sultan had the monopoly of tamed falcons while the Pasha of Cyprus could impose the death penalty on anyone breaking this monopoly.
(See also 90 mils stamp of 1969 Birds of Cyprus)

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Of the twenty-six terrestrial mammal species in Cyprus, six teen are bats. The Mediterranean Horseshoe bat is one of them. It is a medium sized bird 4.5 cm long and with a wing span of 33 cm. It forms large colonies and lives in caves, mines and stables. It gives birth to one young and feeds on small insects and butterflies. It appears certain that bats arrived in Cyprus naturally and were not introduced by man. Very little is known about bats in Cyprus and more needs to be learnt about their habitat selection, behavior, reproduction, population sizes and migration habits. Usually they make their roost sites in caves and mines. The loss of their habitats is one of the major factors affecting their population size. In 2001 a roost of Geoffroy ’s bats was spotted near Kalavasos at the border of Limassol and Larnaca districts. Bats have a life expectancy of 30 years. Of some 4,500 different species of mammals in the world, nearly 1,000 are bats.

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The Greek philosopher Plato (c.428-347 B.C.) considered education a lifelong affair. He used to profess that teachers should have statues erected in their honor ; for if one needed help at some time or other and someone helped one, then one would be much obliged and thankful; but if someone taught one how to satisfy all one’s needs all the time, then one should feel gratitude towards that person, and such a person is the teacher. Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918) an American man of letters once said: "A teacher affects eternity ; he can never tell where his influence stops"". A Chinese proverb says: ""If you want one to eat for today, give him fish; if you don’t want him ever to hunger, teach him how to fish"". A Greek proverb says: ""Learn a trade and put it aside; when in need resort to it"".

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The artist who designed this stamp is A. Tassos. Tassos has designed and overseen the stamps of Cyprus from 1962 to 1976. In 1976 the first Cypriot designers came on the scene, but Tassos continued to design a number of other stamp issues until his death on 13th October 1985. His last design consisted of a set of two stamps for the 10th Anniversary of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus. In Tassos, the Cyprus stamps found all that was lacking in them during all those years of British rule. Their overall expression helps us to perceive the spiritual content of the work, which is expressed, in absolute sincerity. In the Cyprus stamps we can see the designer expressing all that is part of the spiritual and cultural heritage of Cyprus, i.e. life, freedom, justice, passion, death, the struggle, peace, all are portrayed in a profound manner. A British philatelist commenting on the Cyprus stamps of the period of A. Tassos said: "It is enough for me to look at a stamp without knowing the country of issue to know whether or not it is a Cyprus stamp. Their simplicity, clarity, beautiful design and spirituality make them stand out".

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The European Philatelic Exhibition ""Cyprus Europhilex 02"" held in October 2002 in Nicosia was a major success in more ways than one. Compared to the first International Philatelic Exhibition held in October 1995, the participating European countries had increased from 15 to 36 and the number of entries from 112 to 285. The theme selected for the set of stamps and miniature sheet ""Cyprus claims a leading role in the Myth of Europa"" served to emphasize the close connection and common roots that Cyprus shares with Europe both historically and culturally. The 30 cents stamp depicts the oldest Cypriot clay statuette representing the abduction of Europa astride the bull. It dates from the 7th- 6th century B.C. and is housed in the Cyprus Museum.

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The European Philatelic Exhibition ""Cyprus Europhilex 02"" held in October 2002 in Nicosia was a major success in more ways than one. Compared to the first International Philatelic Exhibition held in October 1995, the participating European countries had increased from 15 to 36 and the number of entries from 112 to 285. The theme selected for the set of stamps and miniature sheet ""Cyprus claims a leading role in the Myth of Europa"" served to emphasize the close connection and common roots that Cyprus shares with Europe both historically and culturally. Silver Coin of Timocharis. (End 5th Century, early 4th Century B.C.)

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The Exhibition hosted five competitive sections and one non-competitive (Court of Honor). There were five collections in the Court of Honor, including one from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain. In the competitive section 285 collections in five categories were exhibited and 270 medals were awarded.

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Throughout the ages the spectacle of the circus has provided an ever changing and endearing entertainment to populations in all societies and remains a most popular family outing to this day. In the Roman Empire, circuses featured gladiators fighting to death to earn their freedom, spectacular chariot races where no means were barred, men versus animal duels, equestrian feats with dare devil riders, acrobats and wrestlers. During the European dark ages the circus was forgotten. However, touring performers at marketplaces kept the idea of the circus alive in the hearts of people both young and old.

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