The wall painting illustrated on this stamp comes from the Church of the Transfiguration of the Saviour ( Tou Sotira) at Palechori (Palaeochorio). The building is from the early 16th century, and the interior of the chapel (except for the roof ) is completely painted with a series of wall paintings of the post Byzantine period. In 2001 the Church was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. (A.& J. Stylianou, The Painted Churches of Cyprus, 2nd edition)

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The wall painting illustrated on this stamp comes from the Church of the Transfiguration of the Saviour ( Tou Sotira) at Palechori (Palaeochorio). The building is from the early 16th century, and the interior of the chapel (except for the roof ) is completely painted with a series of wall paintings of the post Byzantine period. In 2001 the Church was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. (A.& J. Stylianou, The Painted Churches of Cyprus, 2nd edition)

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The wall painting illustrated on this stamp comes from the Church of the Transfiguration of the Saviour ( Tou Sotira) at Palechori (Palaeochorio). The building is from the early 16th century, and the interior of the chapel (except for the roof ) is completely painted with a series of wall paintings of the post Byzantine period. In 2001 the Church was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. (A.& J. Stylianou, The Painted Churches of Cyprus, 2nd edition)

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In April 1483 Felix Faber, a Dominican monk arrived in Cyprus. Regarding cats he wrote: "The mouse catcher has good hearing and better smell but best of all is his sight which can pierce the shades of night hence he is called cat: for cattus means cunning and the ancients thought that cats were akin to the Genii or Lares, saying that Genii though unseen by men could not remain invisible to cats.
The Lares were said to be the sons of Mercury and the nymth Lar. They lived in the home of men and guarded them, their seat being in the common hall near the fire, and because cats have flashing eyes and like to lie near the fire, they said they were kin to the Genii or Lares"".
(Excerpta Cypria p.46)

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In April 1483 Felix Faber, a Dominican monk arrived in Cyprus. Regarding cats he wrote: "The mouse catcher has good hearing and better smell but best of all is his sight which can pierce the shades of night hence he is called cat: for cattus means cunning and the ancients thought that cats were akin to the Genii or Lares, saying that Genii though unseen by men could not remain invisible to cats.
The Lares were said to be the sons of Mercury and the nymth Lar. They lived in the home of men and guarded them, their seat being in the common hall near the fire, and because cats have flashing eyes and like to lie near the fire, they said they were kin to the Genii or Lares"". (Excer pta Cypr ia p.46)

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Mother Theresa of Calcutta (1910-1997) was born in Albania to a catholic family who named her Agnes Gonxha Bejaxhiu. At the age of 18 she entered the Order of the Sisters of our Lady of Loreto in Ireland and from there was sent to Darjeeling, in India. She took her first vows in 1931 but received permission from the Catholic Church to leave the order to tend to the poor and the sick of Calcutta. She founded the Missionaries of Charity. Her incessant work and devotion in setting up hospitals, clinics and homes to care for the disadvantaged people, be they children, the terminally ill or the abject poor, earned her the love of the people of Calcutta and the respect and admiration of all the world. She was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1979, but above all she will be remembered for her humanity, humility, kindness, gentility and her unswerving and unselfish devotion to those who needed her most. On Sunday 19th July 2003, about 300,000 people from all walks of life congregated at St. Peter’s Square for the beatification of Mother Theresa, and to hear Pope John Paul II declare her "Blessed" during the open-air Mass over which he presided. The ceremony brings Mother Theresa one step nearer sainthood though many believers considered her a saint during her lifetime.

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When I entered George’s house for the first time I was impressed by the walking stick which was hanging in his sitting room. It was unusual and out of place. I suspected it was something special for him and made a point of asking him. One day I will tell you he replied. Then one day he unexpectedly told me a short story which I now recount for the benefit of he who has little to remember, so that he may remember the refugee. …It belongs to my grandfather he said. He always kept it in the sitting room of his house. He was from Yemoura of Pontos. In 1916 they destroyed it together with Trebizond, and many were killed. He managed to escape and arrived at Smyrna. He remained there until September 1922 when he left to save his life and that of my father. My grandmother disappeared there. He went to Alexandria and there he died. The walking stick he gave to my father and asked him to keep it always in readiness in case he needs it. And indeed within a few years when Nasser expelled the Greeks, my father took the walking stick and left for Famagusta. There he lived until 1971. He asked me to keep the walking stick and to look well after it.
In 1974 I took it with me to the refugee camp at Kolossi. When I had a house built, I too kept it in the sitting room. I believed that one day I will take it to may father’s grave at Famagusta, to bury it there with all the past but a few days ago someone told me that the graveyard had been dug up.

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Pavlos Liasides (1901-1985) was born at Lyssi. He shared his eminence as a dialectic poet with D. Lipertis and V. Michaelides both of whom appear in the set of Cypriot poets issued on 6th March 1978. Liasides created many poetic works, which he wrote in the Cypriot dialect. His first work "Songs of my Island" appeared in 1928, followed by "Flowers of My Heart" in 1933, "Variations in time" in 1937 and "Early morning hours" in 1944. He also wrote theatrical works. The themes for his poems varied; whether idyllic or love poems they derived from the rural life in Cyprus. From the 1960 s and on wards he only wrote articles in newspapers.

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The Cyprus Red Cross Society has worked for almost 50 years to prevent and alleviate human suffering wherever it may be found. Neutral and independent, its membership is open to all persons regardless of race, creed or political conviction. The Cyprus Red Cross offers its humanitarian services in many fields, without asking questions, and reaching out to where state and other services cannot reach. All the Society's efforts are motivated by the fundamental principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. During the Independence struggle of 1955-1959, Penelope Tremayne, who k new Greek well, came to Cyprus in 1957 to organised the first Cypriot Branch of the International Red Cross. She remained on the island for one year.
(Extract from : In the Footsteps of Women, Peregrinations in Cyprus)

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